Split Pea and Tomato Soup

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5 from 1 vote
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For this recipe, I wanted to make a comforting soup. That’s why I had the idea to prepare a delicious kidney friendly split pea soup. For me, it’s a classic recipe that will never lose its charm. And to add that special touch, I wanted to turn it into a thick soup with a touch of tomato so here is my split pea and tomato soup.

Renal diet

Phosphorus

This recipe is high in phosphorus. – The main source is the split peas. As mentionned in the potassium paragraph, you can use less split peas to reduce the amount, but your soup will be thinner.

Potassium

This recipe is high in potassium. – Split peas are already rich in potassium. Due to the fact that it is already high, I have also added tomato paste to this recipe without worrying about the final level to add flavor. You can omit the tomato paste to reduce the amount. The taste will not be the same, but you will cut off some of the potassium. You can also use less split peas to further reduce the potassium level as this is the main source, but your soup will be relatively thinner.

Proteins

This recipe is high in proteins. – Split peas are very high in protein.

Sodium

This recipe is low in sodium. – This recipe is made with unsalted broth and unsalted tomato paste. All other ingredients are naturally low in sodium and as usual, no salt or salty ingredients are used to make this recipe.

How to make a good split pea soup

Here are my tips for making a great split pea and tomato soup :

Cook toroughly your split peas

The most important thing to make this recipe a success is to cook split peas long enough. This means being patient and not attacking the pot with your hand mixer after just 30 minutes of simmering. This is often the time needed for the usual soup, but for this one you need to abstain and wait at least 1.5 hours. To our taste, the split peas are soft enough to make a smooth soup after 2 hours. If you do it too early, it won’t be as smooth as it should.

Start making this soup early

Want to serve this for the next meal? Don’t start it at the last minute. With the long simmering time and the cooling time, you will be disapointed if you try to complete this recipe like a rabbit running through the bushes.

Let the soup cool before worrying about the thickness

This is one of the peculiarities of split peas. Your soup will thicken a lot as it cools. When you stir and it is still hot you will probably find that this soup is too thin. But I warn you, don’t cook it to thicken it if you haven’t let it cool first. Once it has cooled down enough to serve you will see that the soup has become much thicker. That’s the trap of this recipe if you’ve never done it before.

More soup recipes

If you like this recipe, you might also like my other soups :

The Softest Butternut Squash Soup

Roasted Red Pepper Soup

Green Cabbage & Rice Potage

A split-pea soup in a balck bowl on a wooden table.

Split Pea and Tomato Soup

A fabulous comforting soup. Low in sodium and high in protein, this split pea soup is very filling.
5 from 1 vote
High protein | Low sodium | Vegan | Vegetarian
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Preparation 5 mins
Cooking 30 mins
Cooling Time 15 mins
Total 50 mins
Course Soups
Method Cooktop
Servings 8 servings (1 bowl of 250 ml)
Calories 213 kcal

Ingredients
 
 

  • 8 cups unsalted vegetable broth
  • 2 cups yellow split peas
  • 1 onion
  • 2 celery stalk
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 4 tbsp tomato paste
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • ½ tbsp chopped ginger (frais ou en pot)
  • ¼ tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp savory
  • 2 bay leaves

Instructions
 

  • Dice the onion, garlic and celery.
    Chopped onions and garlic on a cutting board.
  • Soften the onions and garlic cloves in a large pot in olive oil over medium-high heat approximately 2 minutes.
    Onions cooking to add flavour to low sodium soup.
  • Combine the chopped ginger and turmeric and cook for another minute.
    Chopped onions and ginger cooking before adding the pumkin and apple dice.
  • Add all the other ingredients, bring to a boil over high heat and simmer over low heat approximately 2 hours or until the split peas are tender and breaking up.
    Split-pea soup simmering in a cast iron pot.
  • Let cool a bit, remove the bay leaves and puree with a hand blender, blender or food processor until the texture is very smooth.

Notes

This recipe produces approximately 2 liters of soup.
When it is freshly blended, you may find that the soup is not thick enough. It is important to know that it will thicken a lot in a short time as it cools. Avoid continuing cooking to thicken it, otherwise it may be too thick when it has reached the right temperature to serve.
If you have any leftovers or consume this soup later, be aware that it will also continue to thicken in the refrigerator.

Nutrition

Nutrition Facts
Split Pea and Tomato Soup
Serving Size
 
250 ml
Amount per Serving
Calories
213
% Daily Value*
Fat
 
2
g
3
%
Sodium
 
77
mg
3
%
Potassium
 
584
mg
17
%
Carbohydrates
 
36
g
12
%
Fiber
 
14
g
58
%
Sugar
 
7
g
8
%
Protein
 
14
g
28
%
Vitamin A
 
195
IU
4
%
Vitamin C
 
4
mg
5
%
Calcium
 
35
mg
4
%
Iron
 
3
mg
17
%
Phosphorus
 
191
mg
19
%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

This recipe is for informational purposes only.

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