Low Sodium Baharat Spice Blend

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Here is my take on a low sodium Baharat spice blend. Baharat is an Arabic word meaning simply “spices”. Usually made without salt, this blend comes directly from Middle Eastern countries and is used for seasoning and cooking many types of foods.

The Baharat spice blend is mainly used for meat, rice and soups. The Baharat spice blend has a rather earthy flavor with hints of sweetness. It is not a spicy mix. Like all other spice blends, it is truly forgiving and can be easily customized to your liking.

Mixing the spices together to make Baharat (7 spices) spice blend.

Why making your own Baharat spice mix

There are many reasons to make your own no salt spice mix. Here are the main ones :

  1. It takes less than 5 minutes to do it yourself.
  2. You can customize it as you want.
  3. It’s possible omit or replace the spices you don’t like.
  4. You know exactly what’s in it.

Renal diet

Phosphorus

This recipe is low in phosphorus. – Due to the nature of the recipe, the phosphorus content is considered low. Spices can contain a considerable amount of potassium and sometimes phosphorus.

However, when used in normal amounts in a meal or recipe, it usually has very little impact on final nutritional values.

Potassium

This recipe is low in potassium. – The same principle applies here. If used in reasonable amounts, this spice blend won’t make a big difference to the final nutritional value of a meal or recipe.

Proteins

This recipe is low in protein. – Usually, spice blends don’t contain a lot of protein. The amount displayed in the nutrition facts is the sum of all of the added spice protein, rounded to the nearest whole number.

Sodium

This recipe is low in sodium. – No salt is used to make the Baharat spice blend. So naturally the sodium content is almost 0mg.

Spices to make a Baharat spice blend

There is no specific or traditional recipe for making a Baharat spice blend. I did a lot of research online to try to find a real traditional blend, or at least more information about it but frankly I couldn’t find anything that wasn’t conflicting.

Ultimately, everyone has his own blend, and it varies enormously depending on the country, the available spices and mostly the cook who created the recipe.

So for my recipe, I created my own mix by tasting different variations of it over the course of an afternoon. In the end, I liked the one I made, but my taste buds couldn’t take more.

However, that doesn’t mean you will like that exact blend, so here is a list of all the spices that are commonly used to make Baharat according to Wikipedia if you wish to modify it. These are the usual whole spices, but you can use their ground counterpart like I did.

  • Allspice
  • Black peppercorns
  • Cardamom seeds
  • Cinnamon (Cassia)
  • Cloves
  • Coriander seeds
  • Cumin seeds
  • Nutmeg
  • Turmeric
  • Saffron
  • Ginger
  • Paprika
All the spices needed to make the low sodium Baharat spice mix.

How to make your own low sodium Baharat

Ground spices

There are many ways to make your own low sodium Baharat spice blend. In this recipe, I’m using already ground spices, so it’s as easy and quick as it gets. You just need to get the right amounts, adjust to taste, combine and use!

Whole spices

If you want to get more flavor, you can try grinding whole spices yourself with a spice grinder. This will give more flavor and the whole spices are easier to store, so you will have fresher ground spices.

Toasting the spices

This is the most complex way, but it is said to create a blend of Baharat with more aroma and depth. Be aware that you will need to toast whole spices, not ground spices.

Again, I haven’t tried it myself yet, so here is a Baharat spice mix recipe from the Daring Gourmet that use and toast whole spices.

If you don’t want to toast spices, skip this step. However, if you take the time to grind your spices yourself, it’s not a lot more of work toasting them first.

A portrait of the low sodium Baharat spice mix presented on a wooden board.

Variations for the Baharat spice mix

Turkish variation

The main difference with Turkish Baharat blend is the addition of mint. This herb can bring a whole new experience to your kitchen.

Tunisian variation

The Tunisian variant is also very different. In Tunisia, they use dried rose petals in their mixture. If you can get dried rose petals, you should try it!

Spicy Baharat blend

Ultimately, it’s your mix. Baharat wasn’t meant to be spicy, but if that’s what you like, why not tweak it a bit? If you want to make it spicy, you can easily add cayenne pepper.

Any type of ground pepper should go well in this mixture too. Just make sure you don’t overpower the overall flavor by adding too much. Add little by little at a time (1/8 teaspoon or 1/4 teaspoon) and taste each time to make sure you don’t mess up your blend.

Smoky Baharat blend

If you want to add a sweeter and smokier aroma to your spice mix, you should try using smoked paprika. Simply trade the same amount of paprika for smoked paprika!

Storing your Baharat spice blend

Cool, dry and dark place

The best way to store spices is to store them in a cool, dry place in a tightly closed container. Also, avoid exposing them unnecessarily to direct light, spices and herbs are photosensitive, some more than others.

Heat and moisture

Heat and humidity can greatly affect your spices. In addition to keeping them in a cool and dry place, you must avoid at all costs dumping them directly into your food, especially while you are cooking.

I’m the first culprit to have this bad habit, but it’s something everyone should pay attention to. Throwing spices directly over your food from the spice container can expose them to a lot of moisture (steam) and heat, two things that can deteriorate spices considerably.

How to use your Baharat spice blend

Dry rub

This mixture can be used as a dry rub for grilling meat. I tried this on a regular piece of steak and it was great. It really changed the taste of meat without overpowering it.

Marinade

This spice blend can be used to make your own Baharat marinade. Simply combine oil, lemon juice and Baharat spice blend to create a truly tasty and unique marinade.

Roasting vegetables

Simply mix your vegetable with oil combined with this Baharat spice blend and give your roasted vegetables a new twist!

Seasonning

You can also use it as is. Combine it with your mayonnaise, hummus, rice, etc.

Conservation

The storage of your low sodium Baharat spice blend will depend on the spices you use to prepare it. It will keep much longer if you use fresh spices. It may also keep longer if you use fresh whole spices.

As a general rule, ground spices bought at the grocery store can usually last up to a year, but 6 months is a safer bet.

They will not be unusable after that time, but they will probably have lost some of their fragrances and flavors. Once they’re tasteless and lumpy, they’re useless and adding more won’t help.

Recipes using this Baharat spice mix

Here is a list of all the recipes I made that use this no salt Baharat spice blend spice blend:

(Coming soon!)

If you like this low sodium Baharat spice blend

If you like this recipe, be sure to check out my other low sodium, salt free and kidney friendly spice blends:

(Coming soon!)

Low Sodium Baharat Spice Blend

Baharat (Arabic word for "spices") is a blend of spices from the Middle Eastern countries which is also sometimes referred as "7 spices". Very versatile and commonly used in those countries, this blend has a rather earthy flavor with hints of sweetness. It is ideal for seasoning various types of foods.
5 from 1 vote
Low protein | Low sodium | Vegan | Vegetarian
This page may contains affiliate links. Click here to see the affiliate disclosure.
Preparation 5 mins
Total 5 mins
Course Spices Blends
Method No Bake, Quick and Easy
Servings 20 servings (1 tsp / 1.7g)
Calories 5 kcal

Ingredients
 
 

Blend with allspice

  • tbsp paprika (9 parts)
  • 1 tbsp allspice (6 parts)
  • 1 tbsp ground cinnamon (6 parts)
  • 1 tbsp ground coriander seeds (6 parts)
  • ½ tbsp ground black pepper (3 parts)
  • 2 tsp ground cloves (4 parts)
  • 2 tsp ground cumin seeds (4 parts)
  • ½ tsp ground nutmeg (1 part)

Instructions
 

  • Just mix all the spices thoroughly. Store in an airtight container in a cool, dry pantry. This spice blend can be stored for up to 6 months, depending on the age of the spices used.

Notes

Note 1 – Customize to your liking
I created this blend to my liking. Feel free to personalize it. Usually, spice blends are really flexible recipes.
If you don’t like one or some of the spices used in this blend, you can omit them or try substituting them. For example, if you don’t like coriander, you can omit it. Read the Spices to make a Baharat spice blend section above to learn about the different spices that can be used in this blend.
Note 2 – What is the traditional Baharat blend?
There is no exact recipe for recreating a traditional Baharat. Baharat is the Arabic word for “spices” and there is as many variations as there is foodies out there.

Nutrition

Nutrition Facts
Low Sodium Baharat Spice Blend
Serving Size
 
1 tsp / 5 ml / 1.7g
Amount per Serving
Calories
5
% Daily Value*
Fat
 
1
g
2
%
Saturated Fat
 
1
g
6
%
Trans Fat
 
1
g
Polyunsaturated Fat
 
1
g
Monounsaturated Fat
 
1
g
Sodium
 
1
mg
0
%
Potassium
 
17
mg
0
%
Carbohydrates
 
1
g
0
%
Fiber
 
1
g
4
%
Sugar
 
1
g
1
%
Protein
 
1
g
2
%
Vitamin A
 
28
IU
1
%
Vitamin C
 
1
mg
1
%
Calcium
 
12
mg
1
%
Iron
 
1
mg
6
%
Phosphorus
 
3
mg
0
%
*5% or less is a little, 15% or more is a lot

This recipe is for informational purposes only.

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